About

About Wild Macaw Association

Costa Rican Nonprofit

Wild Macaw Association is a Costa Rican nonprofit organization that was founded in 2014 for Scarlet Macaw and biodiversity conservation. We are registered as Asociación Lapa Silvestre (3-002-683002) and based in Tiskita Private Biological Reserve, Punta Banco.

Background

There has been a Scarlet Macaw conservation program in Tiskita Private Biological Reserve since 2002. Originally the Scarlet Macaw conservation program was a reintroduction project, which ended in 2014. The reintroduction project started as a collaboration between Tiskita Private Biological Reserve and the late Margot and Richard Frisius, who owned a parrot breeding and rescue center in Alajuela.

Wild Macaw Association was founded by the lead biologist of the former reintroduction project with the support of Tiskita Private Biological Reserve. We have continued the monitoring and study of the released Scarlet Macaws and their wild-born offspring. Our mission is Scarlet Macaw and biodiversity conservation in the South Pacific of Costa Rica.

Scarlet Macaw Reintroduction (2002 – 2014)

A total of 75 Scarlet Macaws were released in Tiskita Private Biological Reserve between 2002 and 2014. The reintroduction project included a study on the survival and behavior of the released macaws, and ecological research. It established a new population in the South Pacific of Costa Rica in an area where the species had previously gone extinct. The current local population size is estimated to be well over a hundred.

Most of the released Scarlet Macaws were bred in Costa Rica by the late Margot and Richard Frisius. They were bred mainly from confiscated, often disabled, birds rescued from the illegal wildlife trade. Others were rescued from the illegal wildlife trade and found suitable for release.

Recent scientific research demonstrates that the remaining Scarlet Macaw populations in Costa Rica have been recovering and that there are genetically distinct subpopulations within Costa Rica. This implies that reintroduction of the Scarlet Macaw is no longer needed and could potentially be harmful, which is why we ended the reintroduction project in 2014 and work together with the University of Costa Rica, and other conservation partners, to focus on developing on-site conservation strategies.

Scarlet Macaw and Biodiversity Conservation (2014 – present)

A new Scarlet Macaw and biodiversity conservation program was launched in 2014 by Wild Macaw Association to replace the reintroduction project that ended in 2014. We have continued the monitoring and study of the released Scarlet Macaws and their wild-born offspring, an ongoing project since 2002, including behavioral and ecological research. Our new program also includes the following projects: wild parrot rescue and rehabilitation, reforestation and biological corridors, biodiversity monitoring, camera trapping, community development, and ecotourism.

Board of Directors

Forest engineer, involved in project planning and networking. Alanna also works for Tiskita Foundation, the nonprofit that oversees the protection of Tiskita Private Biological Reserve ad communityWIld Macaw Association’s partner.

Biologist